How to Make a Puppy Dog Bouquet

Floral Arrangements for puppy bouquet

Floral arrangements take time and effort so that you achieve a particular look with the flowers that you use. Creative arrangements can be made to look like specific things, including a puppy bouquet.

Things You’ll Need
  • Container
  • 12 large chrysanthemums, stemmed
  • Floral foam, will be cut to fit
Instructions
Making the Puppy
Cut the floral foam to fit inside your container using the utility knife. Secure the foam inside the container by using the hot glue gun. Add glue to the perimeter of one flat side of the foam and press it into the container. If you are using fresh flowers, you will need to use waterproof floral tape to secure the foam in place.
Cut your chrysanthemum stems to the desired height. You will not be creating the whole puppy, just its head and front paws, which will hang over the edge of the container. If you’re using fresh flowers, you can cut the stems with scissors or garden shears. You will need wire cutters for artificial flowers.
Place one chrysanthemum stem into the center of the foam, angled slightly toward the back. This will be the head section, which is separate from the rest of the face pieces.
Push one chrysanthemum stem on each side of the head flower into the foam. Push the stems in at slight downward angles, making the blooms face slightly upward. The the petal edges of these side blooms should touch the head petals. Each of the side flowers should be facing out, so it appears that the underneath portion of the petals are touching the head. These are the ears and should be tightly clustered with the head.
Place three chrysanthemum stems into the foam below the head to make the puppy’s face. Two blooms should angle upward, and their petals should touch the head and ear petals. These are the eye flowers. The third chrysanthemum will be the nose flower and should protrude slightly.
Place one chrysanthemum stem on each side of the nose, facing downward slightly, just below the two eye flowers. Your puppy’s head, eye sections, ears and nose are now complete.
Insert one bloom on each side under the last two flowers you added, but angle the blooms down and place them so they hang over the edge of your container. These are the paws.
Insert one bloom on each side just above the paws and facing upward. These are the legs.
Final Touches
Cut your greenery and small flower stems short enough so that they appear to be supporting your puppy. Arrange the greenery and small flowers around the puppy making sure to fill in the back, sides and in between the legs.
Cut your ribbon in half and tie each half into a small bow. Cut two pieces of the .22 gauge floral wire long enough to fit into the foam and stretch out to the top of the head and ear petals.
Wrap one end of a piece of wire around the knot portion of one bow. Gently push one ear aside slightly and insert the other end of the wire into the foam.
Position the bow so that it appears to be tied to the ear, next to the head. Repeat for the other bow, wire and ear.
Glue your stuffed animal eyes and nose into position on the eye and nose blooms. If you are using artificial flowers, you can use the hot glue gun; for fresh flowers, you will need to use fresh flower glue. Your puppy bouquet is finished and ready for giving.
For online flower delivery, visit us at Mayflower.in

How to choose Flowers for Your Wedding Day

How to Choose Flowers for Your Wedding Day

A wedding would just not be the same without flowers. Every bride wants her wedding to be memorable and her choice of flowers or arrangements should reflect her specific taste and personality. Her flowers should create a theme to make her wedding day special and provide the finishing touch to this very special day.

Choose Flowers for Your Wedding Day

1. Understand that there are no right or wrong choices when selecting flowers for your wedding. It is your own personal choice, as your own preferences are the most important part, as well as having a basic understanding of what works well for the theme you’ve chosen and your budget. You can also expect a good florist to provide you with helpful advice, so be prepared to ask plenty of questions and to run ideas past your florist once you reach that stage.
Some basics to grasp before getting into the details include:
Remember that less is more. Flowers are the splash of color, the ornamentation on top of many other already beautiful parts of a wedding.
Good positioning and use of inexpensive foliage can create the sense that you have more floral arrangements than you actually do.
Your florist must share your vision, or it’s time to find one who does.
2. Start by looking through bridal magazines, books, and even gardening books that focus on flowers. If you don’t already have an idea of the types of flowers you’d like to have, simply looking at beautifully photographed flowers can be a lovely way to start getting an idea of what you like. Even consider taking a tour of a local Botanical Garden or a greenhouse where flowers are on display, to get a real feel for how the flowers appear.
Learn the different meanings of the flowers so that this can play a part in your decision; you might want to express certain sentiments through the “language of flowers”. Read How to express yourself using the language of flowers to find the meanings of flowers with accompanying images.
There are some classic wedding flowers with which you can’t go wrong. They are: roses, peony, lily of the valley, hydrangea,orchid, and calla lily. This doesn’t mean you must have any of these flowers but it can help you when deciding to know that these classics are sound choices.
3. Determine your budget. Before you get too excited, do the sums. Some floral arrangements might not be realistic once you have budgeted for everything else, so it’s a good idea to know how much you have to spend on flowers before getting your hopes up. When you visit the florist, you can discuss the extent of your budget and work from there. It’s a good idea to keep some flowers on your “must-have” list and some on your “wish-list”, so that if you do have to pare down, the wish-list flowers can go first without depleting the flowers that you must have. See the “Tips” below for an indication of essential flowers versus nice-but-not-necessary ones, if the budget can’t stretch that far.
Be prepared to be more creative if you’re on a budget.
Don’t hedge around the cost with your florist. Be honest if you can’t afford much; it’ll help your florist look for cheaper but just as lovely alternatives early on.
Use expensive flowers sparingly, such as for the bridal bouquet only.
Centerpieces soon add up. Consider finding less elaborate centerpieces to reduce the costs if your budget is tight.
Feel free to mix and match flower types and to raid the garden as well. All flowers are beautiful, whether they’re cheap or expensive; the important thing is freshness and a price you can afford.
Use fragrant flowers to give the impression that there are more flowers; stronger smelling flowers will perfume a room with ease (for example, frangipani, lilies, hyacinths, jasmine, and sweet peas).
4. Consider the color of the flowers. Color is an important part of your decision about which flowers to have. The colors chosen should complement the bridal gown, the wedding theme, and the clothing of the rest of the bridal party. Colors chosen according to the seasonal availability will allow you the greatest impact for the smaller price, as seasonal flowers will always cost less. When thinking about color, consider what the flowers have to contend with in the room, marquee, or outdoor area where they’re located and be sure to choose colors that will stand out.
Some of the more popular flowers by color choice include:
White: rose, sweet pea, camellia, stephanotis, narcissus, gardenia, orchid, lily of the valley, jasmine, and snowdrop.
Pink: rose, ranunculus, peony, sweet pea, carnation, tulip, protea, boronia, and lily.
Lavender: lavender, lilac, anemone, statice, iris, delphinium, and hydrangea.
Yellow: daffodil, sunflower, tulip, gerbera, lily, and freesia.
Red: gerbera, rose, dahlia, poinsettia, and amaryllis.
5. Consider the season. The season plays an important role in your choice, especially if you’re budget-conscious. While non-seasonal flowers can be flown in, this increases the cost and complexity considerably. And if you’re into locally grown produce, it’s hardly appropriate to have flowers flown in! Some of the more well-known, popular flowers are indicated alongside their season here (noting that there may be regional and climate variances depending on where you live in the world):
Spring flowers: amaryllis, anemone, daffodil, freesia, gerbera, lily of the valley, orchid, ranunculus, stephanotis, and sweet pea.
Summer flowers: anthurium, carnation, chrysanthemum, gypsophila, lily, magnolia, peony, rose, and sunflower.
Autumn/fall flowers: agapanthus, aster, clematis, daisy, hosta, hydrangea, passion flower, and pinks.
Winter flowers: camellia, euphorbia, iris, nerine, pansy, poinsettia, snowdrop, tulip.
All year round flowers: calla lily, carnation, gypsophila, orchid, protea, rose, and tulip (although this list may vary by region).
6. Think about where you want flowers to play a role in your wedding. Wedding flowers can be simple or elaborate depending on the type of wedding that is being planned. Either way, they should have a look of individuality and look as if they have all been specially created for the bride.

Flowers are suitable for the following places and arrangements:

The bridal bouquet, and bouquets for the wedding party members (see below).
Flowers for the church or other place of marriage); flowers can be placed at the end of pews, on the altar, chancel steps, windowsills, around candelabra etc. Floral displays in most churches need to be large to be effective in the huge space of the church; if you have a tight budget, in some cases, you might even share the cost of the flowers in a church wedding if there is another wedding on the same day; that’s totally up to your preferences though). Note that some clergy will oppose decoration of the altar.
A register or registry office building or town hall may be less willing to have your own flowers but it’s worth asking if you can bring in one special arrangement of your own.
A decorated bridal arch or arbor.
A carpet of fresh petals for an outside wedding.
Tables at a sit-down dinner.
Flowers around a hall, marquee, dance area for the reception.

Bridal Bouquet

7. Start with the bridal bouquet. This is the most intimate floral arrangement for the wedding and if you can’t afford many flowers, at least don’t skimp on the bouquet! The bride’s bouquet should be the largest and most spectacular bouquet in the wedding party. White is still traditionally the most popular color for the bride’s bouquet, but many different colors are used in weddings today for the bride and bridesmaids from soft pastels such as pale pink through to rich, vibrant colors such as hot pink, burgundy and violets. Ultimately, the choice of flowers for the bouquet depend on what you want, the style of your dress, your height and your wedding theme. It is recommended that you don’t finalize the bouquet until you have chosen your dress, because the two must match perfectly, and usually the larger the dress, the larger the bouquet.
There are various styles of bouquets. These include round, trailer, sheaf, crescent, line, and cascade bouquets:
Round bouquets are a popular choice for many brides. This style is usually used for large flowers such as roses or peonies, loosely arranged with foliage and tied with a ribbon.
Large trailing bouquets (a cascade) are particularly suited to romantic style wedding gowns. They will only work well with larger dresses though; they overpower anything slinky or close-fitting. These usually consist of flowers wired to a handle; it is both the most traditional and most formal form of bouquet shapes.
Tied bouquets are hand tied casually or wound together with wire. This style goes best with a modern, simple dress at a contemporary wedding.
A posy is a minimalist approach that is very small and usually hand-tied with ribbon; lily of the valley is an ideal flower for this type of bouquet.
A pomander bouquet is usually made without the addition of foliage and it can be suspended on a ribbon for the bride to wear on her wrist.
An elegant line bouquet of lilies is a good choice for a slim-fitting gown.
A modern style bouquet made of exotic flowers and tropical foliage will suit the contemporary bride.
Consider additional embellishments to a bouquet:
Pearls and crystals can be incorporated into bouquets for a touch of added glamour.
For a delicate touch sheer organza ribbon can be used to create ribbon bows and long streamers.
Wide satin ribbon will give a rich, luxurious look.

Bridesmaid’s bouquet

8. Decide upon the bridesmaids’ bouquets. The bridesmaids’ flowers can be a smaller version of the brides flowers or a different shape but still maintaining the color theme. If the bride is carrying a trailing bouquet the bridesmaids could carry round bouquets. Each of the bouquets can be the same color as the brides bouquet. If you do select a different color, ensure that it blends well with the bridal bouquet and the overall wedding color theme. Ultimately, aim for good coordination.
To give a different look, the bridesmaids could carry elegant evening bags filled with flowers. The bag would need to be lined with a piece of plastic to prevent staining the inside of the bag. A piece of soaked florist foam can be placed in the bag and the flowers and foliage arranged in the foam to extend gracefully from the top of the bag.
9. Decide upon the style of the flower girl’s flowers. This daintiest member of the wedding party could carry a small basket of flowers to match the bridesmaids’ flowers. The basket can be sprayed white or a pastel shade. Another alternative is to attach a spray of flowers to a piece of ribbon and tie it around the flower girl’s wrist, tying the ribbon ends in a bow with long ends. This is particularly suitable for a very young flower girl who may find a basket awkward to carry.
One delightful variation is to just give the flower girl rose or other petals in her basket and to ask her to scatter the flowers down the aisle. Naturally, clear this with the wedding officiant and/or building owner first.
Consider a floral bracelet and/or a floral hair ornament to adorn the flower girl. A floral wreath that sits on the hair like a fairy or nymph is another pretty variation. She’ll be super delighted with these special touches.
Consider giving flower girls under 5 a teddy bear or other soft toy with its own corsage. The soft toy can be kept afterward as a thank-you gift.

Preparation for bridegroom and groomsmen

10. Prepare the bridegroom and groomsmen. Although their need for flowers is less showy, it’s just as important, and they will wear a buttonhole/boutonniere. For the groom, provide something that has a slight difference from the buttonholes for the groomsmen – such as a single flower that is the same as one in the bridal bouquet. Flowers that are popular for buttonholes include roses, carnations, orchids, and small varieties of lily. Lily of the valley is popular for buttonholes because it is an expensive flower but goes a long way in a buttonhole.
Consider giving the father of the bride ad groom a special buttonhole of their own.
If you have the budget and the inclination, you could also leave buttonholes in a dish for all guests to take as they enter the church or area where you’re getting married.
11. Prepare the corsages. Both the mother of the bride and the mother of the groom wear corsages. These should complement their outfits. The standard corsage flowers include roses, orchids, camellias, and gardenias.
Often grandmothers and special aunts will wear corsages too.

It is helpful to know the color of the dresses of those wearing corsages, to ensure that the colors will not clash – white or cream is always a safe, neutral choice.

Thus outlined are basic simple steps in going about arranging and deciding on flowers for a wedding.

To order flowers online for wedding, visit us at: Mayflower.in

Flower Auction – Holland

Flower Auction in Holland

The Netherlands became the birthplace of the floriculture sector more than a century ago. In recent years, however, horticultural production has been increasing outside of Europe. It’s a trend that will continue in the coming years. The horticultural world is becoming increasingly internationalized, digitized and virtualized.

The unique combination of specialized growers, collective trading platforms and specialist traders in sales and distribution create a cast-iron international supply and marketing system. Professional transport organisations strengthen the logistics function within that system.

Co-operation between all these parties is the powerful instrument that makes the competitive position of the Dutch horticultural industry unique. It makes Flora Holland the gateway to international trade.

The most beautiful ideas flourish with sound knowledge.One seed out of the ground, comes to realization on the web.The better you sow, the better the harvest.

Flora Holland

Flora Holland is a co-operative organisation of and for growers of horticultural products. As a sales organisation, we are expanding a strong international trading platform in the interest of our members. The exceptional combination of our market places and sales support services allows us to help growers in doing business with their customers.
We focus on achieving maximum returns for our members by contributing to high sales revenues at low sales costs.
In the short and long term. Our ambition is to use our services to improve the market position of our members by:
• expanding an international service network to bringing together supply and demand
• adding value and strengthening distinctive qualities in the sales and marketing of flowers and plants
• reinforcing the central position of the Dutch horticultural cluster in the international market
• ensuring an efficient, capable and thriving organisation

Core values of Flora-Holland

Service, Sustainability, Boldness and Clarity are the four core values of Flora-Holland. Our objective is for all employees to use these concepts to underpin their actions.
• Service for our customers
• Sustainable in our relationships
• Bold in our trading
• Clear in our communication
International trade in plants and flowers is growing. This trend will continue for the coming years, thanks in part to the digitisation and virtualisation of the horticultural world.
FloraHolland is expanding an international service network to bring together the supply and demand of horticultural products. Thanks to intensive collaboration between all parties in the horticultural sector, we provide the gateway to international trade.

Flora-Holland as a Trading platform

Flora Holland has a number of market places with an auction clock sales system and a solid logistics network. The focus in Aalsmeer, Naaldwijk and Rijnsburg is primarily on exporting customers. In Bleiswijk and Eelde, the focus is on the domestic market. Veiling Rhein-Maas (Herongen, D) is collaboration between FloraHolland and Landgard. Flora Holland also supports the outlets by providing an intermediary organisation and customised services such as concept development, personal sales, product promotion and market information.

Green-ports in Netherlands

Collaboration is also evident in the various Green-ports. They are horticultural locations of national importance. All links and support companies together form a strong cluster. The Netherlands has five Green-ports, in which all parties are represented. Green-ports are excellent platforms to conduct joint initiatives and to lobby. For example, for better accessibility and more space.

Green-port Holland

Green-port Holland serves the national interest, and Flora Holland is proud to be on its Board. But we work in other ways to build a strong horticultural sector. For example, by setting up joint projects between agricultural education centers and the horticultural world.
Flora Holland is constantly talking to policy-makers, politicians and directors about themes such as sustainability, mobility, use of space, innovation and education. Flora Holland is actively involved in developing chain-wide solutions in areas such as logistics, e-business and entrepreneurship.
For Flora Holland, corporate responsibility means caring about human, environmental and social issues.
In the fields of transport and logistics, we instigate sustainable initiatives such as transport over rails and water, the use of alternative fuels and collective transport. Innovation in energy consumption will be high on our agenda in the next few years.
Our active contribution to two major fundraising events, Ride for the Roses and Roparun, demonstrates our commitment to help the fight against cancer. Similarly, we believe our commitment to excellent service can only be achieved if our employees are proud to work for Flora Holland and are motivated to deliver the best possible performance.

Flora Holland stimulates the innovative entrepreneurship of its members by sponsoring Tuinbouw

Ondernemersprijs and the Glass Tulip. These prestigious awards are presented for horticultural entrepreneurship and best market introduction of the year respectively. In addition, the public can enjoy every year the floral splendour of various flower parades and annual exhibitions.

• Annual turnover: 4.5 billion euros and over 3,500 employees
• Plant and flower sales: 12.4 billion items a year
• Members: more than 4,500 of which approx. 600 are based abroad
• Customers: 2,400
• Auction clocks: 38
• The Green-port is, with Schiphol airport and the port of Rotterdam, one of the three economic ‘main ports’ of the Netherlands
• Direct and indirect employment within the sector provides 250,000 full-time jobs
• The Green-port is responsible for 20% of the Dutch trade surplus
To order flowers online, visit Mayflowers.in