Household Items to Keep Flower Fresh

How to Keep Flowers Fresh with Household Items

Flowers, though beautiful in nature, provide a pleasing effect and has its own charm and is a delight when someone sends it to you when you least expect it or for that matter from someone least expected. Flowers, being perishable in nature, do wither away in a few days even though the utmost care is taken of the bouquet.

Of course watering the flowers, keeping it away from direct sunlight or wind, trimming the stems daily can extend the life of the flowers to the maximum but there are some other household items lying around which could assist in keeping the flowers fresh for a longer time in your bouquet. The main criteria that causes flowers to decay is the growth of bacteria in the water. The idea here is to control the growth of bacteria which in turn lets your flower bouquet looking fresh longer.
Soda
Not many know but Soda is very useful in assisting the flowers live a longer period. If you put about a quarter cup into a vase full of water of the cut flowers, the sugar in your soda drink will make the blooms last longer. Soda’s such s Spring or 7 Up are apt to use in a clear glass vase so that it matches the water without adding any color.
Vodka
The basic principle of keeping your floral bouquet fresh and last longer is to minimise the growth of bacteria in the water. This is usually done by replacing the water on a daily basis. However, adding a few drops of vodka or any clear spirit in the vase of the bouquet of flowers with act as an antibacterial solvent along with a spoon of sugar. You could do this every alternate day to vastly prolong the freshness and life of the flower bouquet.
Hair Spray
Hairspray is intended to keep and preserve your hairstyle. However a quick blast of hair spray onto the bouquet from a few inches away can give it a good shine especially around the foliage and petals of the flowers.
Apple Cider Vinegar
Mixing 2 spoons of apple cider vinegar with 2 spoons of sugar mixed into the vase water prior to placing the flowers will surely enhance the flowers longevity.
Aspirin or Crocin
It is an old tried and tested method of keeping roses and other fresh flowers live longer. Crushing a couple of pills and putting it into the vase before placing the flowers will surely allow the flowers to bloom better and last longer. Changing the flower vase water every other day will greatly enhance its longevity.
Bleach
Fresh cut flowers last longer with bleach. Adding a quarter spoon of bleach to a medium size vase full of water along with a spoon of sugar will increase the life of the floral bouquet. This will also keep the water from getting cloudy and inhibit the growth of bacteria.
Coins
Fresh flower bouquets delivery usually take a toll coming from different temperatures of storage to delivery vehicle to the final delivery place. Placing copper pennies and a cube of sugar to the vase water will act as an acidifier which prevents the growth of bacteria which will surely assist in keeping your bouquets looking the way they came longer.
Sugar
Sugar nourishes plants, whilst vinegar prevents bacterial growth. Dissolving 3 spoons of sugar and 2 spoons of white vinegar of mild warm water and placing flowers until the stems are covered 3 – 4 inches will keep the arrangement looking fresh longer.
We at May Flower take utmost care of the flowers that come fresh from the farms and till flower delivery we make sure that the flowers are at their best. However, once delivered, the receiver has to take care by watering the flowers delivered to them. When flowers are ordered online and delivered by us, each bouquet comes with a small tag that has few basic instructions to take care of the flowers. Whilst most florists that deliver do not really bother about the life of the bouquet post delivery, we at May Flower want our customers to get the best and make sure they last to get their monies worth.

How to Make a Puppy Dog Bouquet

Floral Arrangements for puppy bouquet

Floral arrangements take time and effort so that you achieve a particular look with the flowers that you use. Creative arrangements can be made to look like specific things, including a puppy bouquet.

Things You’ll Need
  • Container
  • 12 large chrysanthemums, stemmed
  • Floral foam, will be cut to fit
Instructions
Making the Puppy
Cut the floral foam to fit inside your container using the utility knife. Secure the foam inside the container by using the hot glue gun. Add glue to the perimeter of one flat side of the foam and press it into the container. If you are using fresh flowers, you will need to use waterproof floral tape to secure the foam in place.
Cut your chrysanthemum stems to the desired height. You will not be creating the whole puppy, just its head and front paws, which will hang over the edge of the container. If you’re using fresh flowers, you can cut the stems with scissors or garden shears. You will need wire cutters for artificial flowers.
Place one chrysanthemum stem into the center of the foam, angled slightly toward the back. This will be the head section, which is separate from the rest of the face pieces.
Push one chrysanthemum stem on each side of the head flower into the foam. Push the stems in at slight downward angles, making the blooms face slightly upward. The the petal edges of these side blooms should touch the head petals. Each of the side flowers should be facing out, so it appears that the underneath portion of the petals are touching the head. These are the ears and should be tightly clustered with the head.
Place three chrysanthemum stems into the foam below the head to make the puppy’s face. Two blooms should angle upward, and their petals should touch the head and ear petals. These are the eye flowers. The third chrysanthemum will be the nose flower and should protrude slightly.
Place one chrysanthemum stem on each side of the nose, facing downward slightly, just below the two eye flowers. Your puppy’s head, eye sections, ears and nose are now complete.
Insert one bloom on each side under the last two flowers you added, but angle the blooms down and place them so they hang over the edge of your container. These are the paws.
Insert one bloom on each side just above the paws and facing upward. These are the legs.
Final Touches
Cut your greenery and small flower stems short enough so that they appear to be supporting your puppy. Arrange the greenery and small flowers around the puppy making sure to fill in the back, sides and in between the legs.
Cut your ribbon in half and tie each half into a small bow. Cut two pieces of the .22 gauge floral wire long enough to fit into the foam and stretch out to the top of the head and ear petals.
Wrap one end of a piece of wire around the knot portion of one bow. Gently push one ear aside slightly and insert the other end of the wire into the foam.
Position the bow so that it appears to be tied to the ear, next to the head. Repeat for the other bow, wire and ear.
Glue your stuffed animal eyes and nose into position on the eye and nose blooms. If you are using artificial flowers, you can use the hot glue gun; for fresh flowers, you will need to use fresh flower glue. Your puppy bouquet is finished and ready for giving.
For online flower delivery, visit us at Mayflower.in

How To Grow Orchids

How To Grow Orchids

Orchids are among the most beautiful flowers of the entire plant kingdom, combining exotic looks with a diverse set of characteristics. Orchids are exquisite plants, compromising over 30,000 different species and over 200,000 hybrid varieties–making orchids the largest family of plants in the world. Capable of growing indoors and outdoors, orchids are no doubt unique and, unfortunately for some potential green-thumbs, difficult to grow successfully. Someone who hopes to grow orchids should prepare themselves for both the failures and triumphs that breeding this lovely plant variety bring.

1. Select a species of orchid

Some orchids are easier to grow than others. Cattleya, Phalaenopsis and Paphiopedilum orchids are amongst the easiest to grow and are recommended for most beginner gardeners and orchid growers. There are, however, believed to be over 20,000 species of orchid species — that’s 2 times the amount of existing bird species and 4 times the amount of existing mammalian species. There’s almost literally an orchid for any type of person.

Perhaps the most common genera of orchids found for sale include Phalaenopsis, Dendrobium and Oncidium. Phalaenopsis is known as the “moth orchid” and is extremely popular among beginning growers; the genus Dendrobium contains about 1,200 species of orchids and is the classic epiphyte of orchids; Oncidiums are characterized by column wings and a callus at the lip of the flower.

Different genera of orchids have different ideal humidity, growing temperatures, watering schedules, and light requirements. Talk with your local nursery or visit the local chapter of your orchid society to find out what makes your genus of orchid grow best.

2. Choose the right kind of soil for your orchids

Some first-time orchid growers make the mistake of assuming that orchids need to be potted in soil like other blooming flowers, choosing potting soil as a conduit. That would be a grave mistake. Most orchid roots need far more air than potting soil would give them, and so benefit from a looser, more porous mix.
Many people use bark chips, spaghnum moss, coconut husks, charcoal, perlite, and even styrofoam pellets as potting mix, often in combination. Experiment with porous, breathable mixes that you have on hand, or ask an expert for his or her special recipe.

 3. Try a potting mix, or combination of several different mediums

For simplicity’s sake, you can make two basic kinds of potting mixes that will work for most kinds of orchids.

Make a fine potting mix, suitable for slipper orchids, most oncidiums, miltonias, and orchids with small roots that enjoy moisture more than most:
4 parts fine (grain) fir bark or fine (grain) coco husk
1 part fine (grain) charcoal
1 part perlite
Make a medium potting mix, suitable for cattleyas, phalaenopsis, and other mature orchids. If you’re unsure of which mix to use, try the medium-grade potting mix before the fine-grade mix:
4 parts medium (grain) fir bark or medium (grain) coco husk
1 part medium (grain) charcoal
1 part perlite

4. Unless your orchid is a big plant, choose a snug pot for your orchid

Many orchids are comfortable being root-bound. Choose a smaller pot to place your orchid in, making sure that there are plenty of holes in the pot itself for drainage. Remember, the enemy of orchids is often over-watering. Some orchids, such as cymbidiums, will require longer pots to accommodate very long root systems. The following types of pots offer a break from the traditional clay pot (which is perfectly acceptable):

Net pots, which have wire mesh and allow for a breathable environment. These can be hung in advantageous locations for better sunlight.
Clear plastic pots, which get better sunlight to the roots. These allow the grower to inspect the root systems without disturbing the orchid.
Wooden pots, which are constructed of rot-resistant wood. Line any wooden pots with sheet moss before adding your potting mixture.

5. If propagating seeds, be patient

Make sure your hands and your environment are sterile. Scatter just a few seeds immediately beneath the surface of each pot. Add environmentally-friendly fertilizer, if necessary. Again, use the best soil available.

6. Pot your orchid

Remove the orchid from its original pot, making sure to cut off any dead or rotting roots. Divide the root matter into several different sections, if needed, before placing the plant in its pot. The most mature section of growth should be positioned against the wall of the pot. Lightly add the potting mix, barely covering the root system.

 7. Know when to re-pot your orchids

Different orchids benefit from being re-potted accordingly:

Yearly: Dendrobium, Miltonia, Paphiopedilum and Phalaenopsis (and hybrids)
Bi-annually: Cattleya, Dendrobium, Oncidium, Odontoglossum (and hybrids)
Once every three years: Vanda, Cymbidium

Nurturing Your Orchids

Create the right temperature for your orchid. Most orchids originate from a tropical climate, meaning good air, plenty of light, and 12-hour days (365 days a year). The temperature (depending on the species of orchid) should range between 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit (18.3 to 23.8 degrees Celsius).
Make sure that there’s about a 20 degree F (6.66 degree C) difference between day and night temperatures. This must be implemented as soon as you begin.
Make sure your orchids get enough sunlight, but not too much. Many orchids enjoy indirect sunlight: direct sunlight cases them to burn, while not enough creates a plant that doesn’t flower.

Check your orchid’s leaves if you want to diagnose whether it’s getting too much light or not enough. Orchid leaves should be a light, even green if healthy. If the leaves are dark green, it means that the orchid isn’t getting enough light. If the leaves are yellow, brown, or reddish, it means they’re getting too much.

Low-light orchids ( Paphiopedilum, Phalaenopsis, and Oncidium) do best if they get northerly or easterly light. Moderate to high-light orchids (Cattleya, Dendrobium, and Vanda) prefer getting westerly or southerly light.
Orchids love being behind curtains or window blinds. This way, they get plenty of light, but the light that they do get is indirect.
Water your orchid once every 5 to 12 days. It’s easier to kill an orchid by watering it too frequently than by watering it too seldom. During the summer months, longer days and more heat might necessitate a shorter watering period.
Keep the following genera moist (although not soggy) at all times: Paphiopedilum, Miltonia, Cymbidium, and Odontoglossum.
Keep the following genera moist during active growth, but allow to dry in between waterings otherwise: Cattleya, Oncidium, Brassia, and Dendrobium.
Allow the following genera to dry out in between waterings: Phalaenopsis, Vanda, and Ascocenda.
Care for the orchids diligently. Orchids require much more attention than your average plant or flower. The thicker your leaves are, the more likely your plant requires a larger dose of water. If your plant has bulky faux-bulbs, less water is better. Orchids are not resilient in most occasions, but are when it comes to their water intake. Again, they actually deal with a lack of water better than a superfluous amount of water.
Do not over-fertilize your orchids. Typically, expect to fertilize your orchid once a month, but rarely more. Fertilize too often and you’ll chance burning the roots and hampering flowering; fertilize not often enough and you’ll chance hampering the flowering process.
Keep the humidity level up. Because of orchids’ natural affinity for humidity, keep the humidity of your growing room — wherever it may be — at about 60% to 80% at all times.
Understand that each orchid is different. Each strand of orchid has different caretaking needs and rules. No one orchid is the same; all require a different temperature, lighting situation and watering schedule. So when you choose an orchid plant to grow, you must be flexible when growing orchids.
Article got from web links and cross checked by our Horticulturist.
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